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High Resolution Timestamps with Logstash and rsyslog

It’s been way too long since I’ve posted anything here, so I’ve decided to resume again with what I’ve been busy with lately.

We’ve been using Logstash for quite a while now, and one of the annoyances I’ve had is that with the default configuration we threw together we only got second resolution on our timestamps. 99% of the time this has been good enough for the simple things we’ve been trying to keep an eye on, but now and again it’s resulted trouble stitching together the exact sequence of events when trying to diagnose a problem.

Rsyslog is the primary tool we use to get data into Logstash in the first place. As we don’t have the luxury of using anything cloud oriented we need to care about our hardware too, and using syslog makes this very easy. Add to this how simple it is to get most applications to log via syslog too and it makes using it a no brainer.

Getting the high resolution timestamps into your rsyslog messages is actually really simple. Just make sure you have the following configuration option set in your rsyslog configuration:

$ActionForwardDefaultTemplate RSYSLOG_ForwardFormat
Categories: DevOps, Monitoring, Unix

£106.50 per Terabyte Storage Server

With the price of storage dropping all the time, there is a constant perception from people who don’t deal with it every day that “disk space is cheap”, especially when it comes to developers. The problem is that so called “Enterprise” storage costs are still astronomical compared to what people are used to paying for home storage – even when using SATA disks.

A lot of this extra cost comes from a perceived requirement for the highest available capacity, availability and performance. Achieving all three characteristics is expensive, but if you’re willing to sacrifice one of them then costs start to fall considerably. Lowering requirements on two of the three drops it even more.

One of the teams I work with has a requirement primarily on capacity. Performance and availability are nice, but capacity is the key. We generate gigabytes worth of log files every day, but didn’t have one place to store it all for easy analysis. Just before I joined the team they’d purchased the cheapest “Enterprise” storage system the IT team at the time would allow – it ended up costing in the region of £12k for 12TB of raw storage. That’s £1000 per TB!

In addition to the price, the other problems were accessibility and management of the data and managing growth. This inspired a hunt for something that would provide a cheaper and more flexible solution.

Our requirements were:

  • *nix based system. The current storage solution was based on Windows Storage Server, but all our systems and tools for this team are Linux based. Yes, Windows does technically provide things like an NFS server, but fighting with the file system permissions and overall performance are two things that impacted us.
  • Cheap to expand. We need to have a clear path to grow the storage in the server easily by simply adding more disks.
  • Large filesystems. There’s nothing more wasteful from a storage point of view than having lots of small filesystems. Besides the management overhead, there’s also many wasted blocks lying around un-used.
  • Cheap to build. This inevitably means commodity hardware.
  • Reasonable availability. We don’t need 99.999% uptime, but would be happy with somewhere in the region of 90%+
  • Reasonable performance. Primary access to the data on this machine is via gigabit Ethernet. As long as it can keep up with the network card we’re happy…

Read more…

Categories: Linux, Solaris, Stuff, Unix

DevOps: State of the Nation

4 December 2010 Leave a comment

When I got back from DevOpsDays in Hamburg this year I felt the need to explain my journey to the “DevOps” world and my view on where it’s headed. I started writing a State of the Nation paper to lay it all out. A couple of weeks in I got a message from Matthias Marschall asking if I’d like to do a guest post as part of their DevOps series. I agreed, and after a lot of effort (and help from a couple of great editors) you can now read it here.

It’s by far the longest article I’ve ever written, and I was amazed at how ideas that had been floating around in my head for a while crystalized through the processes of writing them down. I found I got so passionate talking to people about what was in it that I’ve decided to make a talk out of it, the first iteration of which will be in Chicago on Tuesday (see previous post).

Quick Chef Tip

11 August 2010 Leave a comment

I’m busy wiring together a new server configuration environment using Windows Deployment Services (don’t ask), Cobbler and Chef. So far things seem to be going quite well, until I bumped in to the following error trying to get a new client to register with the Chef server:

HTTP Request Returned 401 Unauthorized: Failed to authenticate!

A quick sift through Google results didn’t get anything usable. A quick sniff of the packets going over the wire though showed that it was authenticating using a signed certificate. Normally when you sign HTTP requests like that you add some kind of timed expiry. Could the problem be clock related?

Sure enough, a quick check on the new client and the server showed that there was just over an hour time difference. Getting the time on the client and the server in sync got the client registered!

Categories: DevOps, Linux, Unix

Report back from DevOpsDays 2009

24 November 2009 Leave a comment

A few months ago I got an email from Patrick Debois who I’d met at CITCON Europe asking if I’d be interested in speaking at the first conference aimed at System Administrators practising/interested in/sceptical about Agile. One of the key beliefs of those of us doing this already is that Agile practices are generally too narrowly focussed in their implementation. At the moment it’s primarily the Development organization who drive its adoption, but to get the most benefit Development and Operations groups within an organization need to work together.

With this in mind it was decided to call the conference DevOpsDays. Videos of the talks will be online in the archives section soon, so I’ve decided to write down my thoughts about what went well and not so well – I am a fan of retrospectives.
Read more…

EC2 AMI Creation Tips Part 2: Work with Images, not Volumes

8 April 2009 1 comment

It’s been a long time since my first post on EC2 AMI Creation Tips. At the time the primary images people were using were the RedHat based ones supplied by Amazon, but I was trying to do something Ubuntu based. Since then a whole host of other well prepared images are now available. I was even lucky enough to be invited to create an AMI for Sun’s launch of OpenSolaris on EC2, but am not allowed to say much more about it…

Recently though I’ve been speaking to more and more people who are trying to take an existing AMI and customise it for their own use. They do this by booting the AMI they want to base theirs on, doing the customization, then bundling up that volume. Generally they do pretty well, but there are three common themes that crop up that often cause pain: transient runtime configuration being bundled up, the time (and to a lesser extent effort) it takes to bundle the new image in the first place and making further changes to the image down the line.

Thankfully there is a simple single solution to these three problems – bundle from an image, not a running volume, and keep that image (or a set of images) along with some nice helper scripts on an EBS volume. That’s the theory, but as always there’s something in the real world that stops it being easy. By default, only the owner of an image can download and unpack an image directly from S3 and the images are encrypted with the owners EC2 private key. For this process to work, you’ll need to at least bootstrap yourself initially by going through the well known and well documented process of bundling a running system. After that though it’s easy. Really. Promise…

Let’s have a closer look at the problems we’re trying to solve first though before I go into how we fix them.

Transient Runtime Pollution

The most frustrating of these is the udev system flagging the source machines MAC address for eth0 and so making their custom image unusable because the network interface does not come up. There are still distributions out there which try to be “helpful” by remembering which physical device, such as network card, maps to which logical device name, such as eth0. This is not in itself a bad thing. This is one feature I was crying for 10 years ago when I started using Linux on bigger iron. I would dread adding another network card to a server because I would normally end up having to re-label the external interfaces. The thing is though that you’re now creating an image that could be running anywhere and you don’t have physical or even console access to it.

Other examples of things that break are helper scripts. Because we’re now on an operating system image that is meant to be able to run anywhere, there are certain things you want to run only once the very first time the system boots. Once they’ve run the these scripts either create a lock file, clear their own executable bits or even delete themselves. If you’re trying to re-bundle and image you’ve already booted, you need to make sure you back out these changes.

Doing your customization in an image that has never actually been booted helps you keep all these things pristine.

Time and Effort of Creation

This one is actually quite straight forward. When you’re bundling a running volume, what happens under the hood is:

  1. A new sparse file for the image is created
  2. A new filesystem is created on the new image file
  3. This new filesystem is mounted somewhere
  4. The contents of your running volume is copied into the new image file
  5. The new filesystem is then unmounted
  6. The image file is compressed and encrypted
  7. The compressed and encrypted file is then split into chunks
  8. Your manifest is created

Some of these steps very I/O intensive. When you’re working with an image though, steps 1 to 5 don’t happen (well, steps 3 and 5 are needed for you to make changes) so you’ll be doing almost 50% less IO. This means that bundling a new image will take about half time. If you work with your image on an EBS volume it’ll be even faster as they have better performance characteristics than the standard instance stores.

Bundling and uploading images are not simple commands though. You need to specify things like your AWS access key and provide your EC2 encryption key. There’s options for which kernels and ramdisks to use. There’s lots of typing which means lots of room for human error. The way to get around this is to have small shell scripts with all these options in them. Now they are simple commands…

Maintenance

Once you’ve got your new AMI looking the way you want and doing the things you need, chances are that a few weeks after you’ve started using it you find that there’s a security fix or package update you’d like to apply. Often this ends up with people starting the whole process from scratch again. Boot up a new instance of the AMI you want to update, update it, type in all those commands and remember the options you used to bundle the volume and upload the new one. If you kept your scripts and image on an EBS you could simply attach it to a running instance and make the fixes there using the same scripts you used last time. Hows that for repeatability?

“So, just how do I work with an image then?” I hear you ask. Here’s a basic outline to get you started.

1. Set up your environment

These steps assume that you have the EC2 AMI and API tools installed locally, and that you’re running the commands on an EC2 instance. If you don’t have them, please look at EC2 AMI Tools and EC2 API Tools.

You also need some environment variables configured to make life easier:

EC2_PRIVATE_KEY=/path/to/your/EC2/private/key
EC2_CERT=/path/to/your/EC2/cert

2. Create your EBS Volume

The hardest thing will be working out how big you need to make it. Absolute worst case will be 20gb per image, but in reality 10gb should be plenty. Remember though that an EBS can only be mounted in the availability zone it is created in, so this command creates one in the same zone you are in.

ec2-create-volume -s 10 -z `curl http://169.254.169.254/2008-09-01/meta-data/placement/availability-zone`

3. Prepare the Volume

First, attach the volume to a running EC2 instance. Make sure it’s at least the same type (i386 or x86_64) as the image you’re working on.

ec2-attach-volume vol-<your vol id> -i `curl http://169.254.169.254/2008-09-01/meta-data/instance-id` -d /dev/sdp

An EBS volume is a raw bit bucket. You need to partition it (if you’re in to that kind of thing) and create the filesystem on it. Partitions don’t really make sense here though, so just create a nice shiny filesystem on it once it’s mounted on the instance.

mke2fs -j /dev/sdp

In this instance I’m making an EXT3 filesystem, but you can use any filesystem that’s supported by the host machine. Please make sure though that the block device you specify (in this example /dev/sdp) matches what you told EC2 to mount your EBS volume on.

mkdir /ebs

mount /dev/sdp /ebs

This mounts your new filesystem on a directory called /ebs

mkdir /ebs/mnt

mkdir /ebs/download

mkdir /ebs/upload

mkdir /ebs/.ec2

This creates some handy directories to help you along with the process. This is what they do:

  • mnt: Will be used as the mount point to access your image
  • download: This is where you’ll to download your initial bundle to
  • upload: When you bundle an image, put it here ready to be uploaded
  • .ec2: This will contain your AWS access keys and your EC2 PEM files as follows:
    • s3.secret: S3 Secret Key
    • s3.access: S3 Access Key
    • ec2-pk.pem: EC2 Private Key
    • ec2-cert.pem: EC2 Certificate
    • id: EC2 user ID (Note: AWS account number, NOT Access Key ID)

ec2-download-bundle -b your-bucket -a `cat /ebs/.ec2/s3.access` -s `cat /ebs/.ec2/s3.secret` -k /ebs/.ec2/ec2-pk.pem -d /ebs/download -p your-image-name

This command pulls down the bundle you want to customise from S3. As I said before though, this will only work if you have sufficient rights on S3 to download the image and the EC2 private key that bundled it up and encrypted it in the first place.

ec2-unbundle -k /ebs/.ec2/ec2-pk.pem -s /ebs/download -d /ebs -m /ebs/download/your-image-name.manifest.xml

This command uncompresses and decrypts the image file from the downloaded bundle. It takes a while…

4. Customise

Now you’re ready to work. All you need is two shell scripts to go in your /ebs directory. work.sh mounts up your image (if it’s not mounted already) and chroot’s you in and you’re now up and running – customise to your hearts content. When you’re done, make sure you’ve logged out of all your work.sh scripts (yes you can run more than one) and then run bundle-and-upload.sh.

When you’re done, just shut down your host machine. When you want to work on it again later, just boot up a new AMI, attach your volume, mount it up and you’re at step 4 already.

Have fun…

Above the Clouds – This Sounds Familiar…

24 February 2009 Leave a comment

I found a link to Above the Clouds, a paper on Cloud Computing recently published by a quartet of UC Berkeley RAD Lab professors. I’ve been quite disappointed with publications on the subject of the latest buzzword taking the world by storm right now, so I was not expecting much when I first clicked on the link. The thing is, as I started reading through the Executive Summary it all sounded very familiar. The outline the give in the summary follows the same outline as a talk I gave in November last year at the ThoughtWorks London office for the London Java Community.

The only criticism I have is that they don’t put enough emphasis on one of my key reasons for why it’s suddenly taken off. Cloud computing is not a new idea – it’s an extension of the Utility Computing that John McCarthy talked about in 1961. Although they only make a passing remark in section 3, I think one of the most important reasons it’s taken off is that the services Amazon provide were the first that were not a “solution looking for a problem”. Earlier offerings by the likes of Sun, HP and Intel all created a solution that they tried to sell to clients. The problem was that there were remarkably few problems that their solutions solved. Amazon simply exposed services that they were using internally already. That’s not to say the other reasons they give are not valid, I totally agree with them. I think they just missed a good point.

One of the topics I only glanced over is covered cover quite well in section 6 – Cloud Computing Economics. They provide some interesting example cost calculations. Although the numbers are obviously US centric, they do provide a nice way for a company to approach making the old “build vs buy” comparison.

In summary, I highly recommend this paper for anyone who wants to get the head around what this Cloud stuff is all about and what they need to do to prepare for it.

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